Tuesday, September 06, 2005

USB device descriptors and serial numbers

Whenever I've talked about USB storage devices and their serial numbers, someone always seems to ask me, "If I have an image of a thumb drive, can I find the serial number somewhere in the image?"

My answer to this question has been, "Why not go back and take a look at the image with a hex editor...or at least, say, the first megabyte of the image, and tell me if you find the serial number listed?" After all, you can see if a USB device has a serial number (and if so, what it is) using tools like UVCView. Well, so far, I haven't received any email from someone who's done this, so I started taking a look into this myself.

The answer to the question is simply, "No." The reason for this answer is that the device descriptor is usually stored in EPROM, Flash, or some form of ROM, and is not read when the device is imaged using tools like 'dd'. Generally speaking, you wouldn't want to allow the device descriptor to be modified, as a user could alter some of the data, causing an incorrect driver to be loaded, and the device could potentially then be unusable.

Therefore, I'd like to make a suggestion to law enforcement (and everyone else) when it comes to imaging USB storage devices. Make sure that you have a tool like UVCView (or whatever is suitable or available for your platform) on hand as part of your imaging kit, and copy the device descriptor from the device as part of the imaging process.

One of the elements of the device descriptor is the vendor ID, which is assigned by the fine folks at USB.org. This information can be used in a manner similar to the first couple of octets of a MAC address; ie, to identify the vendor of the product.

2 comments:

numist said...

the device descriptor itself doesn't contain the serial number either, the serial number is stored in a string descriptor; the device descriptor only holds the index of the string descriptor (or 0 if the device doesn't have one).

if you want to truly image a USB device, you need to probe and store all of the descriptors.

Keydet89 said...

numist,

Thanks.

> if you want to truly image a USB device...

Do you have any recommendations for doing so?